WASHINGTON – The Arc is distressed that the U.S. Census Bureau is cutting short efforts to count all persons living in the country for the 2020 Census. Ending the self-response phase and critical door-knocking efforts of the census one month early on September 30th risks severely undercounting already hard-to-count populations like people with disabilities, immigrants, people of color, those who are low-income or experiencing homelessness, and other communities. An undercount means the loss of important federal funding for programs like Medicaid, food assistance, housing vouchers, education services, and more – across communities in every state.

“The Arc condemns last-minute plans to essentially cut short the 2020 Census, particularly at a time when people with disabilities and other hard-to-count populations are experiencing unprecedented crisis and indefinite hardship. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities are full members of society and we count. The Administration must not limit our chance to participate in our democracy and be counted,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc. “We urgently call on Congress to act immediately to extend the legal deadline for reporting census data so that there is more time to finish the survey and include everyone.”

Data collected in the decennial census is the foundation for the next decade and must be as accurate as possible for allocating federal funding and ensuring that communities are not shortchanged. Furthermore, the Constitution’s enumeration clause of the 14th Amendment makes it clear that dividing representation and seats in the U.S. House of Representatives must be based on a count of all persons living in the U.S. Abandoning the adjusted timeline for the 2020 Census will unfairly skew Congressional representation and redistricting for the next decade.

The pandemic has brought unprecedented challenges to executing the census. In April, the Census Bureau determined that additional time was needed to safely collect data and to protect the health of the public and census workers who will soon be going door to door to households that have not yet responded.  According to the Census Bureau’s own data, as of July 29, an overwhelming majority of the country is still behind in response rates to the 2020 Census compared to the last census in 2010. The Census Bureau’s new hastily expedited timeline creates confusion, disrupts the planned public education efforts, and makes the job of counting everyone even more difficult.

The Arc also opposed the Administration’s directive issued last month to exclude undocumented immigrants in the 2020 Census count as it applies to Congressional representation.

“This action to rush the census further undermines the ability of the Census Bureau to complete a fair and accurate count. We will continue to push back against attempts to undercut an accurate count and dismiss people with disabilities and other hard-to-count populations. The Arc and our coalition partners have long advocated for the importance of people with disabilities participating in the census and we will not stop here,” said Berns.

The post The Census Must Go On: The Futures of People with Disabilities and Hard-to-Count Populations are at Stake appeared first on The Arc.

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